Ernie

Ernie

Diana Nyad was one of the greatest long-distance swimmers in the world. She reigned for a decade from 1969 to 1979. Diana is an athlete, an intriguing and accomplished lady, and a riveting speaker. In 1979, she performed the longest swim in history from Biminis to Florida, a journey of 102.5 miles and set a world record for a continuous swim without wetsuit.

Carl Lewis won nine Olympic gold and 10 World Championship medals and became the Track and Field News Athlete of the Year for three years. He was also recognized by Sports Illustrated Magazine as the Olympian of the Century and the International Olympic Committee as the Sportsman of the Century. Carl Lewis always amazed us by being a running and jumping sensation for the longest time. Lewis’ unsurpassed talent in long jump and sprints have put him on the high pedestal of success like no one ever did in this generation.

Indeed, black is beautiful. Anyone who has seen Waris Dirie on Revlon, Elle, Vogue, or Glamour print ads and cover will absolutely agree with that. But Waris, who also authored the book Desert Flower, is one special model. She did modeling for a reason and that is not to become famous or to live lavishly. Her motivation was simply to tell her story—a horrific one at that—to shed light and pave the way for more people to know about female genital mutilation or FGM. A ritual she herself became a victim of.

Tim Berners-Lee literally changed the world with his creation of a system that organized data and linked it with other information of its relevance. His invention made the Internet and the computer both a necessity in every home, establishment, and institution. It is the World Wide Web which provided the missing link to what we now call globalization.

Martti Ahtisaari is the former president of Finland, a diplomat, a Nobel Prize Laureate, a Finnish politician, and a famous international peace mediator. Martti Ahtisaari spent three decades of his career in foreign relations, including Finnish Secretary of Foreign Affairs and United Nations Commissioner for Namibia. He joined the Finnish Ministry of Foreign Affairs in 1965 and promoted to various positions in the Ministry between 1965 and 1972.

Three thousand songs—that numbers the compositions of Dolly Parton in her 66 years of existence. She must have a lot of things to say about anything to write down that many songs. Her dedication to contribute for the good of the music industry is unparalleled. A composer with a voice so sweet it could put anyone suffering from insomnia to sleep aptly describes Dolly Parton, the artist. Now add to that her petite but voluptuous frame—and that gives us a picture of Dolly Parton, the celebrity.

What makes someone a winner? Accolades? Wealth? Success? Fame? For most people, winning is all about achieving. A winner is someone who gets what he wants. Lance Armstrong falls in that category. He wants to win no matter what it takes. One way or another, we have heard about Lance Armstrong and his epic fall from grace.

Martha’s success story is special not because she made a fortune in homemaking, but because of the way she handled failure. Belonging to a family of eight, Martha was pretty much on her own when she went to college. There was no hope of finishing school because they cannot afford it. But Martha managed to get herself a scholarship and a steady income to finance her education. Rather than sulk and feel sorry for herself, Martha did everything she could to make her future look brighter.

Most businessmen frown at Richard Branson’s transformational leadership. He’s the kind of leader who does not mind leaving his pedestal to show his rank and file employees how he wants the job done. In short, Richard leads by example. Employees look up to him not because he is the boss, but rather, because they respect the man for what he has achieved and is still achieving. By boosting his people’s morale, Richard turns mediocre employees into excellent ones.

If you look up the synonyms of the word dance it will give you “hop” and “leap.” Essentially, the words—hop, leap, dance—involve movements that put so much strain on the legs. For “hop” and “leap,” there’s no need to be graceful. Now, dance would require a great deal of graceful body movements; otherwise it would not be a dance at all. Walking with one foot—yes a lot of people do that; but dancing? It does not look easy, does it?

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